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These days, the news does an excellent job of reminding us of all of the horrifying possibilities that come with life. Naturally, this works well to keep parents concerned about their children – especially once their teens start driving. 

The desire to protect our younger generations has forced technology to fight to keep up. New apps and developments come out every year, specifically with the goal of safeguarding teen drivers. The real question is, does it work?

Chevrolet Teen Driver Features

Chevrolet is just one of several companies coming up with innovative solutions to the distractible teen driver problem. According to reports, teen drivers are less likely to wear their seatbelts (unless adults are in the car), more likely to speed, and more likely to play loud or distracting music.

In response to these concerns, Chevrolet has designed a Teen Driver feature, available in some of their newer models. These features pester teens to buckle their seatbelts – going so far as to mute the audio until drivers and passengers comply.

These features will help, at least in part. Seat belts save lives, so forcing the issue will help parents sleep better at night. However, there is little this technology can do to prevent passenger or outside distractions for the moment.

General Motors Teen Driver Technology

General Motors is another company aware of the dangers that teen drivers can present to themselves – and others. Like Chevrolet, they offer free features (with certain car models) for limiting distracted driving.

One of the key features is Buckle-to-Drive, where the car will not shift gears until everyone is safely buckled up. Furthermore, these features link up with other GM safety options, including traction control, forward-collision warning, lane-keeping assistance, and blind-spot warning. 

As with any safety technology, it does make a significant difference, especially to the drivers. However, as the technology is still relatively new, it isn’t widely available yet. This creates a different sort of risk and limitation.

Does It Work?

Companies like AAA do believe that these safety measures do help to protect younger drivers. However, they are also well aware of the limitations of the features. As already hinted at above, not all car models come with these options. Instead, they are frequently only available in higher-end models – which means the more expensive ones. 

For many families, this is not a viable option. So ultimately, the answer is that yes: these features could theoretically provide additional safety to teens, but only if they have access to it.